I Like Pink Stuff

I am trans, asexual, panromantic, autistic, and a writer. My preferred pronouns are she/her






~ Sunday, April 20 ~
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Several months ago, I was at a school event where a very young black girl was standing shyly off to the side as I was chatting with some 6th grade students after my presentation. She gave me her notebook and asked me to sign it, which I was glad to do. It was a book of her own poetry and short stories. I smiled and said “I’m so glad to meet a young writer!” She beamed at me and said “I love writing and I want to be a writer but I didn’t think I could because I’m not white.” I was surprised and asked her if she’d read any books by Walter Dean Myers, Angela Johnson, or Linda Sue Park. She nodded and shrugged her shoulder and said, “But I’ve never seen them in person.” To this young teen, an author of color was a mythical creature, not to be believed, until she’d seen one in person. She couldn’t believe in her dream to become a writer until she saw for herself that a real life POC had done it. This is why we must continue to fight for diversity in children’s literature. For all of our children, so that they can see that we exist and that they can believe that their dreams of becoming whatever they want, can come true.

From this great post by Ellen Oh.

This story reminds me, too, of something I always talk about which was that I never met an author until I was like 25. Until then, I didn’t think I could be one because I thought being an author was for special rich people who lived far away, probably in New York, and had some secret access to that whole world. (This was before the internet.) So I can totally imagine how a non-white kid who only ever met white authors would think the way the girl in this story does.

Adults are models of possibility. We need to model all sorts of possibility for all sorts of kids, and can’t ever assume that they just “know” about things existing that they don’t get to see and experience for themselves.

Especially when you’re a poor kid or otherwise not privileged in some way or come from an addicted family, you tend to have people around you that have those same limited and limiting beliefs. I never had goals or ambitions modeled for me by the adults in my immediate family. No one ever said I could and should try things that I wanted to do and have dreams and take risks. I learned survival and getting by, and making do with what you have and staying safe. I was a poor kid, and got that. When I multiply my own experience by a factor of also not-white, I can start to catch a tiny glimpse of what the girl in Ellen’s story and kids like her are up against.

I can stand in front of kids and talk about my background of poverty, and the dysfunction I grew up in, and I do do that, to share my own struggle to achieve a goal. But when I’m talking to a roomful of not-white kids (and I’ve been to plenty of schools like that) I know it’s not the same as if they could see someone who looks like them telling that story. Thanks, Ellen, for sharing this.

(via sarazarr)

Thank you to Sara for really understanding the importance of this issue and for caring enough to share it.

(via elloellenoh)

Tags: ugh racism
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wind-swept-muse:

I really love those images of the universe with all of the different colors colliding, so I decided to use it in an image. 
Dave: (x)
Jade: (x)

wind-swept-muse:

I really love those images of the universe with all of the different colors colliding, so I decided to use it in an image. 

Dave: (x)

Jade: (x)

Tags: wowpretty homestuck john egbert
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sam-brochester:

genalovestoons:

skaviris:

wow, this is like every anime fan remembering their weeaboo stage.

Even Naruto is embarrassed of his Naruto stage.

Even Naruto is embarrassed of his Naruto stage

(Source: deidara-sempai)


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crisolyn-uendelig:

Cecropia Moth


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dezzoi:

Lammergeier/Bearded vulture w/ griffon vulture in the BG

(Source: birdpictures.pro)


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sandandglass:

The Daily Show tries to help white people understand what it’s like to be stopped and frisked. 


68,622 notes
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everythingsbetterwithbisexuals:

lucymontero:

lexkixass:

mooglemisbehaving:

gogogadgetgoatkins:

Mary Bowser, former slave of the Van Lew family, infiltrated the Confederacy by working as a servant in the household of Jefferson Davis. Bowser was assumed to be illiterate, and as a black woman was below suspicion. Practically invisible, she was able to listen to conversations between Confederate officials and read sensitive documents, gathering information that she handed over to the Union.
(From National Woman’s History Museum Facebook Page)

This needs to be a movie. Like, now.

I’d watch this movie.

How is this not a movie?

*throws money at Hollywood*

*Hollywood recasts her as a white man with a gun*

everythingsbetterwithbisexuals:

lucymontero:

lexkixass:

mooglemisbehaving:

gogogadgetgoatkins:

Mary Bowser, former slave of the Van Lew family, infiltrated the Confederacy by working as a servant in the household of Jefferson Davis. Bowser was assumed to be illiterate, and as a black woman was below suspicion. Practically invisible, she was able to listen to conversations between Confederate officials and read sensitive documents, gathering information that she handed over to the Union.

(From National Woman’s History Museum Facebook Page)

This needs to be a movie. Like, now.

I’d watch this movie.

How is this not a movie?

*throws money at Hollywood*

*Hollywood recasts her as a white man with a gun*

Tags: mary bowser black history women's history black women's history reading civil war
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My current project is contemporary fiction

rj-anderson:

karenhealey:

delilahsdawson:

karenhealey:

Me: uggggh I suck so hard at writing this boooook
Me: THERE IS NO MAGIC
Me: NO ONE IS GOING TO DIE
Me: WHAT EVEN IS THE POINT

OH GOD I KNOW THIS FEEL.

How is time supposed to pass if you’re not racing the clock on an adventure to defeat the bad guy and save the world? It’s like, “Oh, well, that was Tuesday and now it’s Halloween and then he spoke to me in November and Thursday evening, we had eggs, WTF.”

I JUST WROTE A SCENE ABOUT A SANDWICH.

This is why, much as I enjoy and admire good contemporary novels, I have never yet written one. Indeed, if the ending third of a certain book seems rushed to some people, it was probably because I was so excited to get to the part I’d been dying to write all along.

(I was also deliberately trying to make that part feel less concrete and real and more of a dizzy rush, so I could call the whole thing into question later on, but that’s another story. Literally.)

Tags: contemporary fiction YA writing where are my spells and explosions
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vinebox:

worst pain imaginable

Tags: queued
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